"In Memoriam A. H. H. OBIIT MDCCCXXXIII: 7"

Discover Tennyson's exploration of grief in "In Memoriam A.H.H."—a poignant reflection on loss & memory. Delve into its profound themes.

"In Memoriam A. H. H. OBIIT MDCCCXXXIII: 7"
1
2
Alfred Tennyson wrote "In Memoriam" after his friend Arthur Hallam died of an aneurysm at age twenty-two. "Dark house, by which once more I stand" is one section of this larger work. Hallam's death was a huge personal blow to Tennyson, and the poem reflects the pain and confusion he felt in the face of loss.
This poem was published in 1850, and became a well-known Victorian expression of mourning. Tennyson writes in stanzas of four lines (quatrains) of iambic tetrameter in an ABBA rhyme scheme. This format became known as "Memoriam Stanza," named after this work.
The setting is a "dark house" on a "long unlovely street." The house, once full of warmth and friendship, now reminds him of loss. Tennyson stands by the "Doors, where my heart was used to beat so quickly, waiting for a hand."
He cannot sleep. "Like a guilty thing" he creeps to the door in search of his friend. No friend is found and no solace either. "Ghastly thro' the drizzling rain On the bald street breaks the blank day."
Dark house, by which once more I stand Here in the long unlovely street, Doors, where my heart was used to beat So quickly, waiting for a hand,
A hand that can be clasp'd no more— Behold me, for I cannot sleep, And like a guilty thing I creep At earliest morning to the door.
He is not here; but far away The noise of life begins again, And ghastly thro' the drizzling rain On the bald street breaks the blank day.

Story From

Alfred Lord Tennyson Collection