"Black Stone on Top of a White Stone"

Explore César Vallejo's raw encounter with mortality in 'Black Stone on Top of a White Stone'. Delve into life's solitude and inevitable ends with our insightful lesson.

"Black Stone on Top of a White Stone"
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"Black Stone on a White Stone" was written by César Vallejo, a Peruvian poet who spent much of his life in Europe, particularly Paris. This poem could be from the late 1920s, a time when Vallejo was facing poverty and isolation.
The poem begins with the speaker's foretelling of their own demise: "I will die in Paris with a rainstorm." César is fearless, "I don't shy away," and yet feels the weight of life on his shoulders, "I've put on my humeri in a bad mood." (Humeri are shoulder bones.) He is alone but pummeled by hardships personified. "The Thursday days and the humerus bones, the solitude, the rain, the roads"—are listed as witnesses to the poet’s death.
I will die in Paris with a rainstorm, on a day I already remember, I will die in Paris—and I don't shy away— perhaps on a Thursday, as today is, in autumn.
It will be Thursday, because today, Thursday, as I prose these lines, I've put on my humeri in a bad mood, and, today like never before, I've turned back, with all of my road, to see myself alone.
César Vallejo has died; they kept hitting him, everyone, even though he does nothing to them, they gave it to him hard with a club and hard
also with a rope; witnesses are the Thursday days and the humerus bones, the solitude, the rain, the roads. . .

Story From

César Vallejo Collection