"Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night"

Discover the defiant spirit in Dylan Thomas's "Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night" and explore its call to celebrate life fiercely. Learn the poignant layers of this timeless villanelle.

"Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night"
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"Do not go gentle into that good night" is Dylan Thomas's most famous poem, written for his dying father in 1947. Thomas says every kind of man has a reason to rage against death. - The wise ones "know dark is right," but their words haven't mattered or inspired. - The good ones see that no "green bay" has come from their "frail deeds." - The wild ones didn't see death coming and spent their lives chasing the uncatchable. - The grave ones did see death coming but could blaze like meteors if given more time.
The poem's final appeal is to his father on a "sad height," where Thomas delivers his iconic line, "Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray, Do not go gentle into that good night. Rage, rage against the dying of the light."
Though wise men at their end know dark is right, Because their words had forked no lightning they Do not go gentle into that good night.
Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay, Rage, rage against the dying of the light.
Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight, And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way, Do not go gentle into that good night.
Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay, Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Story From

Dylan Thomas Collection