Sigh No More

Explore Shakespeare's insight on love's illusions in Much Ado About Nothing. Learn to decode the timeless themes of deception and resilience.

Sigh No More
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"Sigh No More" is a song from the musician Balthasar in Shakespeare's play, "Much Ado About Nothing." The song is a call to accept the inconstancy of human nature and to move forward with a light heart. Balthasar claims people are fickle. Men in particular have "one foot in sea, and one on shore, to one thing constant never."
Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more. Men were deceivers ever, One foot in sea, and one on shore, To one thing constant never.
Then sigh not so, but let them go, And be you blithe and bonny, Converting all your sounds of woe Into hey nonny, nonny.
Sing no more ditties, sing no more Of dumps so dull and heavy. The fraud of men was ever so Since summer first was leafy.
Then sigh not so, but let them go, And be you blithe and bonny, Converting all your sounds of woe Into hey, nonny, nonny.
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The song is full of merry words. One should sing "nonny, nonny" not a sad ditty. One should be "blithe and bonny" (carefree and lovely) and sigh no more. After all, you can't change reality. The "fraud of men was ever so Since summer first was leafy."

Story From

William Shakespeare Collection